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Grant's Getaways: Oregon Shipwrecks



by Grant McOmie

Bio | Email | Follow: @KGWNews

kgw.com

Posted on February 28, 2013 at 1:40 PM

Updated Friday, Mar 1 at 4:52 PM

There’s something about treasure hunting that’s irresistible and compelling; especially when it touches Oregon history and offers unique outdoor adventures too.

Rich Mulcahy likes to say, “When the tide goes out, the treasure table is set.”

“I think it’s that I am going after something that’s been lost, and I am digging in the sand to find it. I love to dig stuff.”

Rich walks long lonely stretches of the Oregon coast each day accompanied only by the excited sounds of his hand-held detector; the device is his constant companion.

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New evidence sheds light on how the Hunley sank a Union ship


The new evidence suggests the Hunley was less than 20 feet away from its torpedo when it exploded. Remnants of the 2-foot-long torpedo were found bolted to the 16-foot-long spar.

The discovery indicates that the torpedo, which held 135 pounds of gunpowder, did not separate from the spar but instead was placed under the Union ship. It was fired by command, not contact.

"There is overwhelming evidence to indicate this was not a suicide mission," South Carolina Lt. Gov. Glenn McConnell, a Hunley commissioner, said in a statement. "They must have believed this was a safe enough distance to escape any harm. If so, they were at least partially right. Thus far, no damage has been found on the actual submarine caused by the explosion."

Because of the Hunley's proximity to the Housatonic and the amount of gunpowder, the concussion from the explosion could have damaged the sub and injured the crew. "Were some or all of them knocked out?" McConnell asked. "How long were they knocked out? Did the submarine's structure with rivets have a similar problem as the Titanic did when it brushed against the iceberg?" He added, "If the rivets give, the pressure of the water could cause leakage."

Scientists will use the new information to create computer simulations of the attack. Scientists also will start peeling away a layer of rock, sand and silt from the sub.

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Victory's Civil War drummer boy writes about Bull Run


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Low lake levels leave plenty of ground for metal detectors to cover


By Robert Medley | Published: January 20, 2013



On a crisp, sunny day on the west side of Lake Hefner, Larry Dobbs walks on what once was water.

His metal detector makes a long beep followed by several short beeps. He's found something under the soft soil. With a trowel he digs up a 2-ounce lead fishing sinker.

photo - Larry Dobbs uses a metal detector Thursday as he looks for lost items at Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City. Area lakes are very low because of the recent drought.
Larry Dobbs uses a metal detector Thursday as he looks for lost items at Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City. Area lakes are very low because of the recent drought.

On a crisp, sunny day on the west side of Lake Hefner, Larry Dobbs walks on what once was water.

His metal detector makes a long beep followed by several short beeps. He's found something under the soft soil. With a trowel he digs up a 2-ounce lead fishing sinker.

Nearby, Dan Pierce is slowly swinging his metal detector back and forth.

“I've got money,” Pierce said. He digs up a copper penny. It's the start of this day's hunt.

Treasure hunters in Oklahoma have found more ground to cover because of extended drought. On dry lakeshores, where the water used to be, metal detectors are finding collectible items

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Many prospectors have agreed that underwater metal detectors are very useful and are a very good invention or innovation brought by modern technology. Such a detector makes it possible for someone to find gold in places they couldn't reach before, therefore these devices really have an important word to say in the technological field.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4938386

Treasure Hunting With Metal Detectors

People who use metal detectors for treasure hunting do tend to run up against an image problem. The media and comedians like Steve Martin have poked a lot of fun at people who use these detectors. But perhaps treasure hunters can have the last laugh when their detectors turn up something valuable, which has happened in the past and is sure to happen again in the near future. It's Easy To Get Started The price of good quality, lightweight metal detectors have been going down in recent years. You can find them at Sears, for goodness' sakes

Treasure Hunting For Opals

Opals have been considered a magical precious stone for thousands of years. It is said to help the wearer's psychic powers and to have better and more vivid dreams. Modern Witches and Pagans especially look for black opals, said to enhance any magic spell. But not are opals rich in myth and magic, they are also really nice to look at. In many ways, they are similar to pearls, but not nearly so expensive

Could there actually be a much more exciting name for a tourist attraction than "Crater of Diamonds State Park". It evokes visions of walls of rock from which there are diamonds the size of grapes just waiting to be plucked. In reality, this is the only diamond site in the world where you can pluck and keep whatever you find, and yes, that does include real diamonds. Anyone interested in gemology or that just wants to have an adventure with the family should not miss out on visiting the Crater of Diamonds State Park. Located in the southern area of Murfreesboro, Arkansas, this land was originally a farm owned by a man named John Huddleston

Treasure Hunting For Turquoise

Turquoise is possibly the most valuable, non-transparent mineral used in jewelry. It has been mined since at least 6000 BC by Egyptians. Like other opaque such as coral, turquoise is commonly sold by the size in millimeters rather than by weight. Turquoise is usually found sandstone layers and can be seen as splotches or as a network of brown or black veins running through the sandstone. There are many small-scale mining operations that are worked by hand

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